DSLR movie from Mosvatnet

Since March 2014 I have been working on a nature production about the amazing Mosvatnet recreational area in Stavanger. My goal has been to document the amazing natural diversity found within the boarders of the fourth biggest city in Norway. The tracks around this lake is used by several hundred thousand people every year, on their way to work, exercise and for recreational purposes. The lake and the surrounding nature/park area is also under extreme pressure from development, management plans and pollution. My hope is that this film can add some knowledge about the amazing natural habitat we have this close to Stavanger, and hopefully we can make sure it will be protected for future generations.

The film was produced as an assignment for the Norwegian Conservation Organization (Rogaland) and Mostun Natursenter.

The entire film was made entirely on Nikon DSLR cameras (D4, D4s and D810) and prime Nikon lenses (16-35mm, 24-70mm, 70-200mm and 200-400mm).

Click image below to see the film on Youtube (make sure to select HD)

Nikon D810 first impression

Nikon D810, 70-200mm, 1/10 sec @ f/11 and ISO 64 / Lee filters

Nikon D810, 70-200mm, 1/10 sec @ f/11 and ISO 64 / Lee filters

Repost from blogspot

As a Nikon ambassador in Norway I was happy to receive the new D810 one week before it was released on the public market. The same evening I went out and gave it a go in the bird cliffs outside Longyearbyen, Svalbard. I made a summary of my first impression with this camera and also a slideshow (from jpegs) and posted it on youtube. To see my first hand field review of the Nikon D810 go to this link; http://youtu.be/Yf-q2frVvvg

After the initial impression from July I have been using this camera a lot, and especially for DSLR video. The quality of the files, both stills and video, is still mind-blowing and I am certain there is no camera like it on the market today!

Photographer giving back

Collage

In English below

I 2009 startet jeg et prosjekt i Bolivia i samarbeid med den ideelle organisasjonen Boliviafamilien. Denne er lokalisert i Sandnes i Rogaland, men har siden den spede starten i 1981 bygget opp 5 barnehjem og 19 dagsenter som til sammen gir over 1000 barn et trygt alternativ i et av Sør-Amerikas fattigste land.

Min opprinnelig plan var ambisiøs, men på grunn av uventede vendinger i min karriere ble jeg nødt til å kansellere prosjektet etter to lengre reiser i dette mangfoldige landet. Som en takk for den hjelpen jeg fikk av Bolivifamilien og de båndene jeg knyttet til Bolivia har jeg bestemt meg for å gi tilbake på den eneste passende måten.

I løpet av november og desember i år vil jeg tilby 10 utvalgte bilder fra Bolivias mangfoldige natur som Fine Art print i et begrenset opplag og til en svært redusert pris. Jeg håper at dette kan generere salg slik at jeg kan gi noe tilbake til Boliviafamiliens barn.

Bildene som tilbys vil bli printet som Fine Art print på Epson Hot Press papir i A3 størrelse uten ramme. De vil bli signert og nummeret 1-30 for hvert motiv.

Prisen på bildet vil være 1500.- der 500.- vil dekke kostnader med produksjonen og logistikk. Resterende 1000.- vil gå direkte til Bolivias barn. Porto vil komme i tillegg.

Finn ditt favorittbilde under og ta kontakt nå for å sikre deg et bildet i begrenset opplag før jul!

En stor takk rettes for øvrig til Stavanger Foto og Rammehjørnet for hjelp med produksjon av salgsutstillingen.

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In 2009 I started a project in Bolivia in collaboration with the Norwegian NGO Boliviafamilien. This organisation is located in Sandnes, Norway but is running 5 children’s homes and nineteen day care centres, offering a safe alternative for more then 1000 children in need.

My initial plan was a grand one, but due to unexpected turns in my career I had to abort after two trips to this magnificent country. As a token of my appreciation for the help I got from Boliviafamilien and also the connection I got with the people of Bolivia I have decided to give back in the only way I see appropriate.

During a period of two months I will offer 10 of my images from the diverse nature of Bolivia as limited edition Fine Art prints to a very reduced price. I hope this will generate sales so I can give something back to the children under care of Boliviafamilien.

The images offered will be printed on Epson Hot Press paper in A3 size only, signed and numbered in a series of 30 each. The prints will not be framed.

The price will be 1500NOK, where 500NOK will be covering the cost of production and logistics. The remaining 1000NOK will go directly to the children of Bolivia. Shipping cost will be added.

Find your preferred image below and order now to get it before Christmas!

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South-Georgia

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In 1775 Captain James Cook was overlooking South Georgia from his vessel HMS Resolution. In his journal he described his view as; ”Lands doomed by Nature to perpetual frigidness, never to feel the warmth of the sun’s rays, whose horrible and savage aspect I have no words to describe”. He did however mention the enormous numbers of penguins and seals seen onshore. Shortly after hundreds of British and American hunters came to exploit these resources. It was the beginning of a new Klondike in the Southern Oceans.

More then a hundred years later the first Norwegian whalers arrived and settled in Grytviken. 22. December 1904 the first whale was caught and the first Norwegian oil generated golden years, and a biological nightmare started.

Wandering albatross

Wandering albatross

During a 60 year period a total of 175 250 whales were taken from the rich waters around South-Georgia. Oil was produced from meat and bones to be used in cosmetics, lubricants, soap and also for burning in lamps to name a few. Even glycerine was extracted and used for explosives.

Humpback whales were first targeted, and then larger animals like the Blue and Finn whales. After World War II the Humpback was extinct in the Southern Ocean and the other targeted species had dramatically low numbers. The whalers were struggling and went on to capture Elephant Seals during the last years. In the early 60s the Norwegian whalers went home and left Grytviken.

Grytviken remains

Grytviken remains

Despite the efforts to wipe out marine life around South Georgia the island still is paradise for any nature lover. All sheltered bays and harbours are teeming with life. Hundreds of thousands of King Penguins gather on the beaches and Fur seals and Elephant Seals fight for their spot on the shore. A truly fascinating place!

Ice berg

Ice berg

Scavangers of the Southern Ocean

Scavangers of the Southern Ocean

Salisbury Plains

Salisbury Plains

Elephant seal bull

Elephant seal bull

Elephant seal

Elephant seal

King penguin

King penguin

Fur seal

Fur seal

Sooty Albatross

Sooty Albatross

Okavango

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The Okavango Delta in Botswana, is the world’s largest inland delta. It is formed where the Okavango River empties onto a swamp in a closed drainage basin in the Kalahari Desert, where most of the water is lost to evaporation and transpiration instead of draining into the sea.

Each year approximately 11 cubic kilometres of water irrigate the 15.000 km² area. Some floodwaters drain into Lake Ngami. The flood peaks between June and August, during Botswana’s dry winter months, when the delta swells to three times its permanent size, attracting animals from kilometers around and creating one of Africa’s greatest concentrations of wildlife.

Hippo pool

Hippo pool

Sometimes called a ‘swamp’, the Okavango is anything but. Moving, mysterious, placid, gentle and beautiful, from a wide and winding channel it spreads through tiny, almost unnoticeable channels that creep away behind a wall of papyrus reed, into an ever expanding network of increasingly smaller passages. These link a succession of lagoons, islands and islets of various sizes, open grasslands and flooded plains in a mosaic of land and water.

In the lush indigenous forests of the delta and its islands, and along the floodplains spawned by this great marriage of water and sand, more than 400 species of birds flourish. On the mainland and among the islands in the delta, lions, elephants, hyenas, wild dog, buffalo, hippo and crocodiles congregate with a teeming variety of antelope and other smaller animals –
warthog, mongoose, monkeys and tree squirrels to name just a few.

Yellow-billed stork

Yellow-billed stork

The Namibian government has presented plans to build a hydropower station in the Caprivi Region, which would regulate the Okavango’s flow to some extent. Environmentalists argue that this project could destroy most of the rich wildlife and plant life in the Delta.

African wild dogs

African wild dogs

Elephant at dusk

Elephant at dusk

Flying Kudu

Flying Kudu

Leopard

Leopard

Lioness

Lioness

Spotted hyena

Spotted hyena

Hippos at dawn

Hippos at dawn

Gorillas of Rwanda

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The Volcanoes national park is situated in the northern parts of Rwanda. This 160km² national park protects the Rwandan sector of the Virunga Mountains, range of six extinct and three active volcanoes which straddles the borders with Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Volcanoes National Park is best known to the outside world as the place where for almost 20yrs the American primatologist Dian Fossey under took her pioneering studies of mountain gorilla behavior. It is largely thanks to Fossey’s single-mindedness that poaching was curtailed while there were still some gorillas to save. For her dedication, Fossey would pay the ultimate price still some gorillas still unsolved – murder at the Karisoke Research Centre in December 1985 is generally thought to have been the work of one of the many poachers with whom she crossed swords in her efforts to save her gorillas.

The Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) is one of the two most endangered apes in the world with less then 800 individuals remaining in the wild. Just over 300 are found in Bwindi Impenetrable NP in Uganda, while the remaining are found in the Virungas.

Virunga NP

Virunga NP

The Gorillas are generally gentle and shy. The mountain gorilla is highly social, and lives in relatively stable, cohesive groups held together by long-term bonds between adult males and females. Typically the groups consists of 2-40 individuals, averaging about 11. The groups are led by a dominant male, commonly called the silverback. The silverback serves as the chief leader and protector of the group.

Border of the park

Border of the park

The primary threat to mountain gorillas comes from forest clearance and degradation, as the region’s growing human population struggles to eke out a living. Mountain gorillas are not usually hunted for bushmeat, but they are frequently maimed or killed by traps and snares intended for other animals. They have been killed for their heads, hands, and feet, which are sold to collectors. Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo have been politically unstable and beleaguered by war and civil unrest over the last decades. These conflicts have had a very negative impact on the population. Several programs have been established to safeguard the last remaining mountain gorillas. Especially noteworthy is the International Gorilla Conservation Programme, which was established in 1991. During the last few years the population has been having a stable increase, but with such low numbers they still need extensive monitoring.

Further readings: http://gorillafund.org/
Current issues: http://savevirunga.com/

Silverback and his wife

Silverback and his wife

Gorilla group

Gorilla group

Bad-hair-day

Bad-hair-day

Eco-tourism

Eco-tourism

Local children

Local children

Madidi

Spider monkey

Passing through the Madidi Mosaic in Bolivia I witnessed one of the most biodiverse habitats on our planet. At the same time I saw new roads, burnt forests, logging, mining and coca plantations. All threatening this beauty. In addition, the government is planning a huge dam just outside of the national park, flooding enormous areas of indigenous settlements, about 2000 square kilometers, and species unknown to mankind.

No protected area on earth has a greater variety of life than the Madidi Mosaic. This fact alone demonstrates the urgency of protecting this area. Since the creation of the Madidi National Park in 1995 funding for international non governmental organizations to work in these areas has poured in. Unfortunately, these past ten years have demonstrated the increasing degradation of these areas.

The roads built by the lumber companies and governmental promises of employment in the sugar refinery, a senseless project that is currently being developed which involves burning thousands of hectares of the most biodiverse forests in the world, were the first motivators of migration into the area by colonizers. This is perhaps understandable, as many of these decisions were made in governmental offices before there was much awareness of the importance of the area. Also mining, petroleum extraction, are serious threats to this diverse ecosystem. As well as direct habitat loss these activities also come with an increase of new settlers and infrastructure.

Bolivia has among the most beautiful mountains in the world, rivaled only by the Himalayas. From altitudes well over six thousand meters, waters from these mountains work their way down to the Amazon. The waters form mountain lakes from which small streams trickle, some of which become rivers or form powerful waterfalls, moving on down through cloud forests, into subtropical forests, converging into navigable rivers which facilitate access into tropical forests. A few years ago a fifty year old plan to build a dam in the Madidi National Park was revived by politicians. Through the efforts of a few these plans have been stopped, but only temporarily.

Cloudforest

Cloudforest

Riding the rapids

Riding the rapids

Moth on a rock

Moth on a rock

Burning forest for Coca farming

Burning forest for Coca farming

Coca leaves

Coca leaves

Coca farming

Coca farming

Rainforest

Rainforest

Rescued Spider monkey

Rescued Spider monkey

Rainforest fern

Rainforest fern

Tarantula

Tarantula

Possum

Possum

Squirrel monkey

Squirrel monkey

Brown Capuchin monkey

Brown Capuchin monkey